Vietnam War remembered in Beaufort

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Ron Voegeli, left, and Morris Campbell salute after setting the floral wreath in at the Beaufort National Cemetery.
Ron Voegeli, left, and Morris Campbell salute after setting the floral wreath in at the Beaufort National Cemetery.

Photo above: Ray Davison of Camden, SC, stands with other members of the Patriot Guard Riders on Monday at the Beaufort National Cemetery. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

More than 100 people gathered for the Inaugural Vietnam War Commemoration held at the Beaufort National Cemetery.

The www.USHistory.org website describes it thus; “The Vietnam War was the longest war in United States history. Promises and commitments to the people and government of South Vietnam to keep communist forces from overtaking them reached back into the Truman Administration. Eisenhower placed military advisers and CIA operatives in Vietnam, and John F. Kennedy sent American soldiers to Vietnam. Lyndon Johnson ordered the first real combat by American troops, and Richard Nixon concluded the war.”

The official United States Marine Corps Color Guard Posts the Colors to begin the Vietnam War Commemoration.
The official United States Marine Corps Color Guard Posts the Colors to begin the Vietnam War Commemoration.

“Despite the decades of resolve, billions and billions of dollars, nearly 60,000 American lives and many more injuries, the United States failed to achieve its objectives.”

Most of us remember the war, even if we don’t like to talk about it. But on Monday more than 100 people were on hand for the Inaugural Vietnam War Commemoration held at the Beaufort National Cemetery. Monday marked the 50th anniversary of U.S. involvement in the controversial war in Southeast Asia which claimed more than 56,000 U.S. lives.

The Vietnam War Commemoration was set up to do three primary things:

1. To thank and honor veterans of the Vietnam War, including personnel who were held as prisoners of war or listed as missing in action, for their service and sacrifice on behalf of the United States and to thank and honor the families of these veterans.

2. To highlight the service of the Armed Forces during the Vietnam War and the contributions of Federal agencies and governmental and non-governmental organizations that served with, or in support of, the Armed Forces.

3. To pay tribute to the contributions made on the home front by the people of the United States during the Vietnam War.

Many ‘Nam Vets’ and their families were on hand, some still able to wear their uniforms seen shaking hands and hugging each other and remembering those comrades-in-arms who gave the ultimate sacrifice.