The real meaning of Thanksgiving

in Community by

Photo above: Linda Robinson left, dishes up some dressing for Gregory Theodore at Tabernacle Baptist Church’s meal. 

By Bob Sofaly

Thanksgiving is a time of giving and sharing and none more wonderful than providing a traditional Thanksgiving dinner to those who couldn’t make it themselves for whatever reason. Although many churches in town provide holiday meals, this year we visited the St. Helena Episcopal Church and the Tabernacle Baptist Church to share their efforts to really embody the spirit of the holiday. If you have never volunteered on a holiday to help with one of these types of dinners, you should. It is really what the holiday is all about.

From left: Deacon John Evans of Tabernacle Baptist Church loads a serving tray with fresh baked ham and roasted turkey; Rev. Kenneth Hodges, right, pastor of Tabernacle Baptist Church, spends time with George Koczou, left, and Fr. Paul Holovatch of West Haven, Connecticut during the church’s annual Thanksgiving meal. Fr. Holovatch and long-time friend George Koczou have no living family left so they spend Thanksgiving in other areas of the country learning about the local culture. Koczou said they decided to come to the Sea Islands to learn more about the Gullah culture; Savanah McLeod, left, and her twin brother Mark celebrated their birthday on Thanksgiving Day during the Community Meal at St. Helena Episcopal Church. The twins turned 13; Don Campbell, center, finds the perfect slice of pie while Betsy Mumaw, right, eyes the cupcakes on display on the dessert table during St. Helena Episcopal Church’s Community Meal on Thursday. Hundreds of meals are served in the social hall as well as carry-out dinners are provided for the homebound; community members sit together and enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving meal Thursday at St. Helena Episcopal Church.