Life in hover mode

in Contributors/Health by

By Martha O’Regan
Do you ever have days when you laugh out loud at how obvious your life’s journey reveals itself? You know, those moments when we are able to draw on a lesson learned or some tool acquired in a past experience, that when complete, we have a level of confident satisfaction that we are right where we are supposed to be.  And, it feels good.
Some of my favorite moments in the work I do are when I encourage a practice member to go into “hover” mode (aka “higher self”) and look down on his or her life as though it were a maze.  By hovering over that maze, the person can begin to see why certain doors had to close (or slam), while some had to open, wrong turns had to be made, while some right ones just fell open, and even why sometimes she or he got stuck in a roundabout that took great guidance to get out of. The person can see the folks who showed up right on schedule to teach them something then drifted into a distant memory or the ones who showed up seemingly out of nowhere that have stuck in their hearts and lives forever.  In these moments of great clarity, it’s fun to watch those lights that have been dimly lit for years begin flickering and glowing with a new awareness of their purpose here on earth. These are the moments when we remember that everything in life happens for us, not to us, and that every experience is part of our evolution
The fact is: Life happens! We all come in, we all go out and we get to choose everything in between. Some awaken early in life where they have to draw upon their inner strength and courage to get through a difficult life experience.  These are the people who know early on what they want in life, are all in to follow their passions and create businesses and networks that are supportive and successful.
Then there are others who wait until a little later in life and find their core through pain, illness or loss, often during a time when life was moving right along then suddenly, they were bushwhacked and forced to “find themselves.” These are the folks who transition from having “just a job” or “just living,” then wake up one day to realize they aren’t fulfilled.  Once aware, they become all in creating a life based on how it feels, often unsure of what they are doing or why, but sensing that it just feels right. Their trust is ultimately rewarded with abundance of many measures.
Finally, there are those who are never really all in until the last few hours of their life.  These are the ones who insisted they were always right, barreled through life trying to control it and others, worried about everything, even those things they couldn’t control, and who basically believed they were in charge. The good news is, even though those last few moments may be filled with many “shouldas, couldas, and wouldas,” they can choose to look back without judgment of what could’ve been, along with gratitude of what was.  Hopefully, even amongst the regret, they can find the good, allowing for a smoother transition.
So, where are you in this list?  Are you all in now, planning to be all in when your physical body dictates, or waiting to be all in while you’re on your way out?
When you look upon your maze of life from hover mode, relish in the chaos and confusion and allow it to bring you clarity for the rest of your joyful ride.
Live Well … Have Fun!