Gullah heritage celebrated

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Photo above: Aunt Pearlie Sue, portrayed by Anita Singleton, was the mistress of ceremonies during the annual Heritage Days celebration at Penn Center. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

Thousands of people from all over the country crowded onto the grounds of Penn Center for the annual Heritage Days on Nov. 11. Those in attendance were treated to good food, good music and live authentic Gullah entertainment from the venerable Aunt Pearlie Sue (Anita Singleton) and the Gullah Kinfolk.

Regina Good of Sumter flips over funnel cakes, a popular favorite at the annual Heritage Days.
Regina Good of Sumter flips over funnel cakes, a popular favorite at the annual Heritage Days.
Attendees of the annual Heritage Days celebration stand and sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” The song, also referred to as the “Black National Anthem,” was written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 and later set to music in 1905.
Attendees of the annual Heritage Days celebration stand and sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” The song, also referred to as the “Black National Anthem,” was written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 and later set to music in 1905.
Pvt. Terry James, left, portraying a soldier of the 54th Massachusetts, and Sgt. Gilbert Walker, of the First South Carolina, walked around Penn Center grounds and gave a living history as they answered questions about what it was like being a black Union soldier during the Civil War.
Pvt. Terry James, left, portraying a soldier of the 54th Massachusetts, and Sgt. Gilbert Walker, of the First South Carolina, walked around Penn Center grounds and gave a living history as they answered questions about what it was like being a black Union soldier during the Civil War.